Make your comment count if your B12 injections are being stopped!

First of all THANK YOU so much for your signatures and sharing of our petition which asks if we can access our B12 injections OTC from a pharmacy.

Petition update: Last year Nicky Morgan my MP met with Dame Sally Davies about the petition and the lack of education our GP’s receive on B12 deficiency.
Dame Sally Davies then wrote to the then Chair of The RCGP (Royal College of General Practitioners) about the outcome of their meeting. In the midst of all this Brexit got in the way.

Dame Sally Davies then stepped down and so did the Chair of the RCGP.  So the communication chain here was broken.

Then we had a general election.

This meant that over 7 and a half years of work between myself and my MP had to start again. They were not allowed to keep past records from constituents so all that work and communication on their side was deleted.

You’ll appreciate how depressing this all was.

The work of getting the petition in front of those who can help us to change things did start again a few weeks ago when I met with my new MP Jane Hunt.

Jane has been involved from the very beginning as she was Nicky Morgan’s case worker. She has had to put up with 7 and a half years of me making a nuisance of myself regarding B12, so is fully primed and backs us all the way.

Please consider commenting or writing to your MP too.

This update is asking if you could take the time to comment on the blog posts below to state if you are being denied B12 injections due to #Covid19 or for any other reason. The reason for this is so that my MP can direct those she is working with directly to patient experience.

The problem with only commenting on FaceBook is that this moves quickly and gets lost. Your comments on the blogs give us a clear picture of what is happening to you and it gives us a permanent place to show those who can make change.

If we could buy B12 ampoules from UK pharmacies and self inject this would save millions for the NHS, take pressure off GP Practices and people with B12 deficiency could be in charge of their own healing.

Obviously in the midst of Coronavirus NHS and GP services are under huge strain.
Many are being told their essential injection appointment is cancelled, if all our MP’s and health agencies can work together then maybe we can make change in the not too distant future by making injectable B12 available over the counter.

So please comment here;

If you are being denied treatment due to Coronavirus please comment here;
https://www.b12deficiency.info/blog/2020/03/17/the-new-c-word/

If you are being given tablets instead of B12 injections due to GP’s lack of knowledge:
https://www.b12deficiency.info/blog/2019/07/26/wherever-we-are-in-the-world-we-are-all-in-the-same-boat/

If you are being told you no longer need B12 injections because your levels are normal:
https://www.b12deficiency.info/blog/2019/06/20/a-bizzarre-and-wasteful-practice-is-your-doctor-following-this-crowd/

The World Health Organisation has hydroxocobalamin listed as an essential medicine, we need B12 to live so let’s work together.

Finally, many of you have been asked to “chip in” financially by Change.org to get this petition in front of more people. That “Chip in” money goes to the very wealthy Change.org owners. It does not go directly to the cause you might be supporting. We can do the sharing ourselves without a cost to anyone.

Obviously any spare cash you have at the moment would be welcomed by food banks and the most vulnerable.

If in the future you want to support www.b12deficiency.info this can be done via the donation button at the foot of my website.

Thank you and take care
Tracey x

 

Wherever we are in the world, we are all in the same boat…

There are many problems associated with diagnosis and treatment of B12 deficiency and many of them boil down to a lack of education of health professionals. They have all been done a disservice.

This is a worldwide problem.

Serum B12 blood results
I help people to access the treatment they need and always urge people to get a copy of their current and historical results. In some cases they have been found to be below range, but the result has been ignored whilst the patient has continued to deteriorate. Remember you are legally entitled to your results.

Our GP’s may be unaware of the limitations of the serum B12 blood test, that it can miss seriously deficient patients and that this can lead to a within range result being batch filed and labelled as ‘normal’.

Lack of education of this common condition means that our GP’s don’t necessarily understand that they cannot wholly rely on the blood results. The clinical picture is of utmost importance and if the patient is symptomatic it’s vital they access correct treatment for B12 deficiency.

It is important to note that the Active B12 test (holoTC/ Holotranscobalamin) is not gold standard either, remember that the clinical picture is key.

Treatment with tablets
Too many GP’s in the UK (and in other countries) try and treat B12 deficiency with B12 tablets and if the patient includes animal products in their diet, like the one the result belongs to below, then their deficiency is not caused by dietary lack and injections are essential. If you cannot absorb B12 from food then a tablet taking the same route won’t work either.

NICE Guidance states:

  • Not thought to be diet related — administer hydroxocobalamin 1 mg intramuscularly every 2–3 months for life.
  • Thought to be diet related — advise people either to take oral cyanocobalamin tablets 50–150 micrograms daily between meals, or have a twice-yearly hydroxocobalamin 1 mg injection.

The above result at 144 ng/L is below range and is definitely showing B12 deficiency, the patient has many neurological symptoms and as I have said, includes animal products in their diet. Unfortunately this GP (and others in the Practice) believes that 50mcg cyanocobalamin tablets are the best way to treat this patient.

In reviewing these results, the GP added their own note stating:

“B12 low, script for cyanocobalamin and repeat 2 months”.

The second sentence originates from the lab and states:

“Note low B12, deficiency possible, treat if clinically appropriate otherwise repeat after 2 to 4 months and review.”

The issue with the lab note is the term: ‘deficiency possible’ –  surely this should read ‘definite B12 deficiency’?

All labs are different, all assay kits are different and all reference ranges are different. This lab below has a low reference of 150ng/L and in my area it is 220 ng/L, in East Lancashire it’s 110 ng/L. There is no across the board standard which help either the doctor or the patient.

The patient that these results belong to continued to feel unwell, had absolutely no abatement in symptoms but due to the supplementation of the 50mcg tablets there was a small raise in the serum B12 level to 161ng/nl. This confirmed to the GP that the patient could absorb B12 and they were instructed to continue with the tablets. In fact, the patient was told that they could ‘definitely absorb B12’.

CRIKEY

This would not have happened had the GP been properly educated about B12 deficiency.

Waste of time, money and NHS resources
This patient went back to see the GP repeatedly due to feeling no improvement and each time their B12 serum level was tested. Each time they were told that they should continue with the tablets for another 2 months. How frustrating is it to even read this, never mind live this?

My recent involvement in this case provided the information the GP needed to treat the patient as per NICE Guidance and how cyanocobalamin should only be used for patients with B12 deficiency of dietary origin.
However, I was told that the Practice were following another protocol and that they felt the patient hadn’t taken the tablets religiously and this was the reason for no improvement.

WOW

After nearly a year of zero improvement in symptoms I think most of us would be hard pushed to take a tablet which was proving to be a pointless treatment.

A tricky but simple case
Thankfully common sense has now prevailed and the Practice has decided to give the patient the correct treatment of B12 injections. It took many phone calls and emails for this to be actioned. The people I asked to speak to were often ‘in a meeting’ but I don’t give up.

It should not be that any patient is left for 11 months without correct treatment for this common and easy to treat deficiency.

This practice were very annoyed that I was advocating for the patient, they said that there was no need for “3rd party involvement” however in this case and in fact all that I get involved in, there absolutely was a need.

Until education on B12 deficiency is the norm, it will continue to be that outside agencies are needed to help health professionals of all disciplines to understand the seriousness of this condition and what correct treatment should be.

We are all the same
Many of us know how difficult it can be to challenge a doctor, especially those that have their heels so firmly dug into the ground.

Fortunately I learnt long ago that it can be unsafe not to challenge doctors, that they are no different to the rest of us, that they are not infallible, and they can correct their mistakes if they choose to – if the infrastructure allows them to.

I am thankful to all those health professionals who appreciate being furnished with the correct information about B12 deficiency and who regularly use my site.

Best wishes

Tracey
www.b12deficiency.info

You can read testimonials here.

B12 deficiency, the fantasy & the reality

The BBC came to the first day of the 2016 conference and as part of their report they needed to get a ‘balanced’ view of B12 deficiency so they interviewed a GP. This slide below shows the statement provided.

IMG_3100

As you can see, this GP from the RCGP (Royal College of GP’s) has stated that;  “GPs are highly trained individuals and I have absolutely no doubt of their ability to diagnose and thereafter treat vitamin B12 deficiency.”

The fact is that from experience, we know that this is a fantasy, many of our GP’s know that this is a fantasy and I’m sure that even the doctor speaking those words knows that the statement he gave (or was given) is a fantasy.

There is no doubt that GP’s are highly trained – but they are not highly trained in nutrition, and certainly not in B12 deficiency. How can they be when it doesn’t feature in their curriculum?

The stark reality for B12 deficient patients, not just in the UK but globally, is that for the vast majority of clinicians including consultants, doctors, nurses, medical students and even NHS Nutritionists,  education in nutrition is sparse and in the case of vitamin B12, it can be non existent. Even some privately trained nutritionists do not understand the essential need for B12 injections rather than oral supplements in those who cannot absorb B12 from food.

Unless a clinician has a personal interest; suffers from this condition themselves or they have a family member with it,  they very often have no idea of the many causes and symptoms of B12 deficiency or of the seriousness of it. They may be exposed to limited information on just pernicious anaemia which, in reality, represents the very tiny tip of the iceberg.

Myths are learnt or picked up during their careers;

That too much B12 is toxic, that levels over 2000 post injection are ‘dangerously high’

That the symptoms experienced are psychosomatic

That B12 is a placebo and that the more you have the more you want

That 4 injections a year means you have a vast store of B12 in your liver, enough to last you years

That even though you include B12 in your diet, that your deficiency is dietary

That you can now miraculously absorb B12 now because their computer says so.

This is all incorrect.

An example of the reality for many patients is contained in the letter below. This was sent to me (and launched my website www.b12deficiency.info) there are even worse examples contained within the letters page.

You can see from this letter that my GP contacted a gastroenterologist, a ‘Specialist’ who should (in an ideal world) know a little about B12 deficiency and the gut, however, he felt I should see a psychotherapist and be prescribed anti depressants for my B12 deficiency symptoms. He came to this conclusion without ever meeting me. Bizarre practice?

My GP perhaps contacted this gastroenterologist because she felt her own knowledge was not enough or she needed someone else take the responsibility? I feel she was let down by someone else whose knowledge ‘was not enough’ either.

Specialist letter (2)

My GP thought the suggestions in the letter were reasonable until I pointed out that yes, I could spend £50 talking to a psychotherapist but what I would be saying is “I’m here because my GP won’t give me the B12 injections I need.”  I also asked my doctor why she thought her memory was more important to her than mine was to me. Thankfully I was prescribed more frequent B12 injections.

Many people write to me to ask “who is the best specialist for me to ask my GP to refer me to regarding B12 deficiency”. The answer to that can only be; ‘the specialist who understands what it means to be B12 deficient’ and tragically, the experience for so many is that those are few and far between. Too many patients find themselves out in the cold, desperately under treated or misdiagnosed with other conditions simply due to a lack of education and awareness.
Our clinicians have been done a great disservice, it’s complete madness that nutrition is not the biggest part of medical training.
If we look at this from the GP’s point of view and consider the long years of intensive training,  a patient tries to tell them they’re missing something so fundamental.  They might think it ridiculous that this seemingly enormous potential for misdiagnosis of B12 deficiency were fantasy on the patients part. Surely if it was so important then surely it wouldn’t have been missing from their education, it would have warranted in-depth learning and be a part of all modules and not just the couple of hours they may actually spend on the subject?

How can our GP’s look for something they don’t know they should be looking for? If their eyes haven’t been opened by personal experience and their peers dismiss B12 deficiency as a nonsense afflicting hypochondriacs, then the chances are that they might conclude this too.

I want to share this Ted Talk on ‘The Power of Generalism’ by Dr Ayan Panja with you because it served to remind me of the daily challenges and wide ranging skills that GP’s have. Due to the my own experience and that of those who write to me, I am guilty of forgetting this from time to time.

 

In the UK the average GP is allocated around seven minutes to with each patient. This includes listening to the complaint, diagnosing and prescribing. This is unsatisfactory for both parties. Sometimes it is easy to forget the previous kindness and excellence of our individual GP’s when the gaping chasm of knowledge of B12 deficiency looms.

This situation can lead to a drastic change in the patient-doctor relationship. The emails I receive every day very rarely champion the GP or the specialist. They are from desperately ill people who are being, dismissed, under treated and generally given short shrift. This needs to change but the ‘system’ is not making this easy for either party.

There are GP’s who are able to treat B12 deficiency correctly as per patients symptoms, there are others who feel their hands are tied and there are some who presume that they know how the patient feels, better than their patient.

Some enlightened GP’s are fully aware of the terrible hand dealt to B12 deficient patients and if we could all work together on this then our relationships would remain intact.

I feel my job with the website is to help patients to remain under the care of their doctors. In order to do this, some patients have to try and educate, sometimes this is an insurmountable task and patients end up ‘going it alone’. This is far from ideal.

There are ‘powers that be’ in the NHS, the government and other agencies who are well aware of the situation and scale of the B12 deficiency problem. Thousands of us have reported it and there are countless journals spanning decades backing up what we say,  but so far it remains suppressed. The comment from the GP to the BBC bears this out.

By working together we can make a difference.

Best wishes Tracey

www.b12deficiency.info

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/b12deficiency.info/

Twitter – @B12info

If you need any help or information, please contact me here.

Remember there is no clinical evidence for our restricted treatment – your doctor may not be aware of this and might be inclined to increase the frequency if they were?

http://www.b12deficiency.info/blog/2016/09/28/the-tanks-empty-but-i-can-smell-petrol-so-you-have-90-days-more-driving-ahead-of-you/

 

‘The tank’s empty but I can smell petrol so you have 90 days more driving ahead of you’ …..

If this advice were given by a garage we’d know they were kidding –  but a similar instruction is given in the UK to too many B12 deficient patients regarding their treatment.

NICE and BNF Guidelines advocate a maintenance dose for patients with neurological symptoms is one injection every two months. This is very often ignored and a move straight to a three monthly maintenance dose (after a 6 injection loading dose), is the norm. This is based on NO CLINICAL EVIDENCE whatsoever yet it appears to be set in stone.

I have spent quite some time trying to find the research for the bizarre idea that four B12 injections per year as a maintenance dose is ‘optimal treatment’, since this restricted regime harms those who are in dire need of a nutrient their systems are starved of. The term ‘optimal treatment’ is used to describe our quarterly maintenance dose in a series of GP audits which I blogged about earlier this year.
It was decided that district nurses time could be saved by lessening the frequency of B12 injections given, so this was eventually adopted nationally without any care for the patient. Our UK maintenance dose guidelines are based on cash saving exercises.

At the end of this blog post are the replies I have from various agencies; NHS England, Public Health England, Health Select Committee, British National Formulary, NICE, to the question;

“Please can you show me the clinical evidence which states that the three monthly maintenance dosage for B12 deficiency is optimal treatment.”

You will see that everybody addressed passes the buck and thinks that someone else has this elusive information which so many doctors adhere to. The emails take a circular route which, of course, yield no result whatsoever since there is no clinical evidence.

In a letter to my MP, Sir Bruce Keogh of NHS England stated “Most patients respond well to quarterly injections”, but where is his source?

It’s quite obvious that a great many patients do extremely badly on 3 monthly injections. Patients who email me with the subject line; ’Desperate’, ‘please help’ or ‘Am I going mad?’  And the 1000’s of members of online support groups are also testament to this.

A serum B12 level can show as ‘within range’ for weeks or even months after a single B12 injection or even a single oral supplement.  This can fool doctors into thinking there is plenty of B12 circulating and available to draw upon when, in reality, there isn’t any B12 available to the patient.

If you want to understand the complexities of B12 deficiency then this document on the enterohepatic circulation of B12 will help.

This is what Kevin Byrne (author of the above) states –

“The problem arises when you start to believe that the damage accruing from a long term deteriorative process can be fixed with a handful of injections, and when you take serum levels as a direct measure of the functioning of a distant, complex organic process.”

Many clinicians do not understand that;

• When a B12 injection is given, the majority is excreted via the bladder & bowel within 24 hours.
• B12 is water-soluble, non toxic & costs pennies.
• Progression of nerve damage is inevitable in patients who are starved of B12.
• B12 is vital for life, is required to produce healthy red blood cells and for DNA synthesis.

Both patients and clinicians are being led up the garden path;

The vast majority of GP’s are not fully educated on this very common, debilitating condition and they think they are advising patients correctly based on the limited information they were taught.

There are enlightened doctors who know that 3 monthly injections are a tortuous proposition for many patients they see and they treat appropriately by symptoms.

Worryingly there are also doctors who are informed, who want to treat patients appropriately but feel their hands are tied, either by their colleagues or by even more restrictive ’practice guidelines’ which appear to take precedence over National Guidelines. Or, these doctors are terrified of being reported to the GMC for ‘unusual prescribing’, quite bizarre when what we are discussing is a non toxic essential vitamin.

Evidence of this clinical evidence is nowhere to be found, It simply does not exist. It is a myth generated to save time and money and has had the opposite effect, costing the NHS and in turn society, millions if not billions of pounds. This is due to the inevitable misdiagnoses that occur when doctors fail to understand that four injections a year will never be enough to heal damaged nerves in many patients.

Trying to put a forest fire out with a teaspoon of water would be just as futile.

What other group of patients with a serious debilitating condition would be subjected to the same illogical and harmful treatment regime?

Whilst the vast majority of clinicians lack up to date knowledge of B12 deficiency & whilst treatment of this condition remains so illogically and harmfully restrictive, it becomes even more essential for patients to be able to access injectable B12 over the counter in the UK.

Patients don’t want more injections than they need, they just want to be able to function and get on with life. It is time once again, to shine a very bright light on exactly why UK patients are kept chronically ill and unable to work on this ridiculously low frequency, based on no clinical evidence whatsoever.

If you are in the UK, you can help by sharing this information with your MP and by asking them to contact my MP, Nicky Morgan (nicky.morgan.mp@parliament.uk) so that they can work together on this urgent issue.

Many thanks Tracey
www.b12deficiency.info

Emails below;

To: Health Committee <HEALTHCOM@parliament.uk> (Dr Sarah Wollaston)
Subject: Re: Clinical evidence for B12 treatment

Dear Victoria

Thank you for your email and the link. However you misunderstood my question. I am asking for “clinical evidence” not “clinical guidelines”.
Please can you point me in the direction of the clinical evidence that states that a three monthly maintenance dose of a 1ml b12 injection is optimal treatment for B12 deficiency? I recall Sarah stating to one of her constituents that she is aware of this evidence.

Best wishes
Tracey
www.b12deficiency.info

Health Select committee (Dr Sarah Wollaston)

<HEALTHCOM@parliament.uk> wrote:

Dear Tracey

I have asked Sarah’s office but unfortunately between us all we can’t track this information, you will need to contact NHS England/Department of Health.

Sorry I couldn’t help.

Best wishes

Victoria

Public Health England;

Hi

Thanks for your email to Public Health England. This falls outside our remit, however we are unsure who you should approach. It might be something NHS England can help you with.

Regards

PHE Enquiries.

NHS England:

Dear Tracey

Thank you for your email of 8 August within which you requested information about the clinical evidence regarding the two and three monthly maintenance doses for B12 deficiency.

NHS England is unable to advise regarding this matter and it is recommended you contact National Institute for health and Care Excellence. Contact details are available at: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance
Further information regarding B!2 can be reviewed at: https://www.nice.org.uk/search?q=b12

I am sorry I am unable to assist you further and trust the information above is sufficient to progress your enquiry.

NICE;
(Please note I cut a whole load of this enormous email out to save you falling asleep – It was the text from the page highlighted)

Dear Tracey

Thank you for contacting NICE.

NICE produces a range of guidance and information products, including clinical guidelines, which are recommendations on how healthcare and other professionals should care for people with specific conditions. Our clinical guideline topics are referred to us by the NHS England. I can confirm that we have not been asked to develop a guideline relating to the care of people with B12 deficiency.

I believe that the resource that you have located is clinical knowledge summary (CKS) on Anaemia – B12 and folate deficiency. CKS are developed by an external company and we work with the publisher to make them available on the NICE Evidence Services website, as a source of advice for health professionals working in primary care, while they may refer to NICE guidance (if there is any that is relevant), they also use many other sources. It is important to note that they do not constitute NICE guidance.

The evidence behind the recommendations in the CKS is presented underneath the recommendations under a subheading ‘Basis for recommendation’. I hope this is helpful.

Kind regards
Janet

(I didn’t find it helpful obviously, they point towards lots of journals who don’t have the evidence we require and to the BNF; here is their response below; )

BNF British National Formulary

Thank you for your email to BNF Publications.

Unfortunately we are unable to access our archives to check what evidence base was used to determine the 3 monthly dosage of hydroxocobalamin.

BNF content will be reviewed in line with the SPCs for future updates of the BNF.

Kind regards,

BNF Publications

You will see from my previous blog on this subject that I also asked all the Marketing Authorisation holders  who provide injectable B12 in the UK where their evidence for the three monthly maintenance dose came from and each of them drew a blank too.

http://www.b12deficiency.info/blog/2016/02/16/uk-b12-deficient-patients-paltry-3-monthly-maintenance-dose-of-b12-injections-is-based-on-cash-not-care/

 

B12deficiency.info 2016 Conference 17th and 18th June – Education for all, B12, methylation and thyroid.

I am delighted to announce our second event and Sally Pacholok will be with us again!

email-banner

The conference will attempt to address the gaps in the diagnosing and understanding of these conditions and the effects on both physical and mental health.

Please note: This is NOT a two day conference, an identical programme will run each day.

Ticket price £62.00
Includes: Presentations, lunch, refreshments, attendance certificate for CPD and free on site parking.


This conference is for all with an interest in the subjects both personally and professionally.

If you are a patient you will learn more about your condition. If you work with people in any field of mental or physical health then this conference will provide high clinical relevance and an attendance certificate for CPD.

It has been arranged by Tracey Witty of www.b12deficiency.info to promote greater awareness and understanding of B12 deficiency, methylation and thyroid disease.

PLEASE NOTE: There is no sponsorship from, nor affiliations to pharmaceutical or vitamin companies at this event (or throughout www.b12deficiency.info).

The speakers are highly knowledgeable, experienced and engaging. They will discuss the multi-systemic and polyglandular nature of the conditions, diagnosis and misdiagnosis.

Q&A time with the speakers is scheduled.

In addition to our speakers we will hear from three patients who will present their own case studies.

Last years attendees said; – Thanks for organising the excellent conference, the speakers were all very engaging and enthusiastic. I don’t think I have ever been at a conference that so many people stayed until the end, especially on a Saturday!

– I am an acupuncturist and during the conference I realised that my training in B12 deficiency was woefully inadequate. Knowing so much more about B12 and methylation has completely changed my practice!

Meet the Speakers

Sally Pacholok RN BSN
Presentation on –
The effect of B12 deficiency on all body systems. Symptoms, causes, those at risk and common misdiagnoses.

Sally was a licensed Advanced Emergency Medical Technician and worked as a paramedic prior to and during nursing school.

In 1985 aged 22, Sally diagnosed herself with vitamin B12 deficiency, after her doctors had failed to identify her condition. Over the past two decades, she has frequently found untreated B12 deficiency in the patients she cares for and has campaigned to raise awareness of this all too common debilitating neurological condition.

During her presentation Sally will be using case studies to show how b12 deficiency affects people of all ages, including babies and children. She will also be reviewing the pathophysiology, signs, symptoms, risk factors, causes, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment.

Sally’s book inspired Emmy winning film producer Elissa Leonard to produce a documentary on misdiagnosed B12 deficiency in 2011 click to watch. Elissa then went on to produce a feature film based on Sally’s life click to watch.

Anne Pemberton
Functional Medicine Practitioner MSc, PGCE (Autism), RGN.
Presentation on –
Genetic Polymorphisms in Chronic fatigue and Autism: Supporting the role of B12 and Folate and their connection to HPU (Kryptopyrroles).
Anne spent the first 25 years of her working life as a registered nurse in cardiac intensive care. Her son’s diagnosis of autism and the lack of medical help was the catalyst for Anne’s decision to retrain as a functional medicine practitioner.

Anne is now the Course Director on the MSc in Nutritional Therapy at the Northern College of Acupuncture in York. She also runs a busy international clinic, with special interest in CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) and autism.

Anne uses nutrigenomics data from 23andme.com alongside appropriate functional testing, in order to establish each person’s individual health requirements. She has co-written the first UK based practitioner nutrigenomics course in the UK which is delivered twice yearly in York and London. Anne has also co-authored a book with Dr Damien Downing ‘The vitamin Cure for Digestive Disease’.

Dr. Afshan Ahmad BSc, PhD.
Presentation on –
The effect of thyroid replacement in patients with ‘normal’ thyroid chemistry and clinical signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Development for Vaccine Research Trust, a charity established in 1982 which supports research into why a group of people present with signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism but continue to have blood tests within the reference range. She co-founded Vaccine Research International Plc and helped Dr Gordon Skinner in his thyroid clinic in Birmingham, working closely with him in his dealings with the GMC. In 2000, they published a paper on the effect of thyroid replacement in patients with ‘normal’ thyroid chemistry and clinical signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Afshan qualified with a BSc degree in Immunology and Microbiology from London University in 1983 and joined Dr Gordon Skinner’s vaccine research group at the Medical School, University of Birmingham in 1985, she completed her PhD in Medical Microbiology in 1999.

Dr Joanne Younge
Associate Specialist Old Age Psychiatrist.
Presentation on –
Audit on B12 and folate deficiency in the elderly.

Joanne graduated from Queen’s University, Belfast, in 1996 and is an Associate Specialist Old Age Psychiatrist in an NHS Trust.

Joanne is a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Clinical Lecturer at Queen’s University in Northern Ireland. Her main interest is improving care for patients, either through quality improvement initiatives, using Institute for Healthcare Improvement methodology, or audit.

She co-authored ‘CBT for mild to moderate depression and anxiety’ in 2014 and an audit on improving patient safety, ‘The impact of introducing a Lithium care pathway’, was published as an example of shared learning on the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) website in 2015.

The introduction of an electronic care record, with better access to blood results, and improved insight into the potential impact of deficiencies prompted an audit into B12 and folate deficiency in the elderly patients referred to the local service. She is hopeful that the audit, presented at the conference, will have an impact on improving patient care in the future.

_______________________________________________________

To book your place click here

To read more please visit the conference page.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Best wishes, Tracey