Gloucestershire treatment algorithm is harmful and at odds with NICE

Gloucestershire is a beautiful county – but like the villages in Midsomer Murders, a potentially harmful place to live if you need B12 injections and your GP follows this Primary Care Management Treatment Algorithm. (4th section down).

How many B12 deficient patients are at risk of permanent damage in this area? How many struggle with poor mental health? How many are bed bound, confused, living in pain believing that their B12 deficiency is being ‘treated’ so wondering what on earth is causing their body and mind to feel like it’s shutting down?

There are threads on Twitter of doctors from Gloucestershire proudly sharing this treatment algorithm and feeling really smart because they were ahead of the COVID 19 curve in giving just about everybody oral B12 supplements.

It’s all in your mind…

I’ve heard of many patients being told that their debilitating symptoms can’t be due to B12 deficiency. That it’s more likely to be due to their age, their lifestyle, or the fact they have young children, or a stressful job, or – and this is the worst, that it’s all in their “imagination”.

So the long suffering patient is either sent to hospital to see every other Tom Dick or Harry in a network of ‘ologists’ often waiting months for appointments in order that it satisfies the urge of the GP to pin the symptoms on ‘something else’ because ‘it won’t be B12 deficiency causing the symptoms because your serum levels are really high at 200pg/ml.”

My own deficiency could have been ignored if I’d lived in this area. You’ll see they don’t appear to bother with people with serum level’s over 180pg/ml. I was diagnosed with a level of 216 (reference range of 220 -771). I wouldn’t even be worthy of the GP looking at the chart despite my many presenting symptoms. The problem of differing reference ranges of B12 levels has been well documented and the BMJ state that there is no ideal test and that the clinical picture is of utmost importance.

Terrifying isn’t it?

What’s really worrying about B12 deficiency and the way it is handled by those who have little knowledge of it, is that the patient very often starts off in the dark and then remains in the dark because they ‘trust’ that their GP is ‘all knowing’. They don’t consider that the information their GP has imparted is not complete, not properly informed, not helpful. They then deteriorate, but don’t question their treatment, don’t ask Dr Google, don’t seek more information because they have been either pushed down another path for a further red herring diagnosis or just simply ignored.

How to start treatment with B12 injections in Gloucestershire using this algorithm: 

  1. Your B12 has to be lower than 180pg/ml
  2. You must have neurological symptoms (on their list)
  3. You must have macrocytosis and anaemia
  4. You must be positive for anti intrinsic factor antibodies – (but after loading you will be put on oral tablets!)

But if you are not presenting with the list of ‘allowed neurological symptoms’ i.e. those recognised by your GP – and you have no anaemia (which by the way, is not always present and can be a very late stage symptom) then, even if your result falls between 150-180 – the GP is instructed to:

“Reassure the patient that this is unlikely to be of concern. Recheck serum B12 after 3 months, if still low, monitor B12 level every 6 months for 1 year and then annually for 2-5 years.” 

Now I’m no rocket scientist but even I know that this is pure bonkers. It still offers no treatment.

B12 deficiency comes in all shapes and sizes, with many causes and many symptoms

If I use my own case as an exercise of using this algorithm here: –
My level was 220, I had no anaemia, no IFA, no neurological symptoms that they list, but I was losing my memory, I had bowel and bladder problems, blurred vision, insomnia, anxiety, low back problems to name a just a few and yet I wouldn’t warrant treating. I dread to think how quickly I would have been confined to a care home with early onset dementia if I had been ‘cared for’ here.

Even if I had PA, if my GP had used this chart I would be placed onto oral tablets following the loading dose. This is complete madness. (Please see more on the low quality evidence on oral supplementation  here)

If my deficiency had been caused by malabsorption due to a drug such as metformin for diabetes I would have been advised to take calcium supplements or increase dietary calcium but would not be  given B12 injections in fact I would only be allowed B12 oral tablets. This is totally bizarre, misinformed guidance.

Where is the patient?

At no point does this algorithm suggest LISTENING to the patient or considering the clinical picture. The patient doesn’t exist here, just blood forms and it’s completely wrong.

The only tiny mention ‘people’ get here is the suggestion that buying oral supplements over the counter may be cheaper than the NHS Prescription charge. WOW.

This algorithm is at odds with NICE guidance and is a ridiculous home-made protocol which won’t work for the vast majority. It’s time for Gloucestershire to start following good practice for patients.

What NICE state:

  • Not thought to be diet related — administer hydroxocobalamin 1 mg intramuscularly every 2–3 months for life.
  • Thought to be diet related — advise people either to take oral cyanocobalamin tablets 50–150 micrograms daily

So what can be done?

If you are in Gloucestershire – (or anywhere else this is happening), why not take action to make change? Your voice counts and you absolutely matter.

Why not contact;
The Expert Patient Programme – (The EPP is an NHS initiative to improve the lives of those living with long-term conditions such as diabetes, Parkinson’s, lupus, epilepsy, ME, arthritis, fibromyalgia or heart disease). NHS Gloucestershire offers the Expert Patient Programme (EPP) which you can access by telephone on 0300 421 1623

B12 deficiency is a long term condition, you have a lot to offer, make sure you are represented! Get you voice heard here and ask for their help.

Healthwatch
You could also call Healthwatch Gloucestershire on 0800 652 5193 tell them your story, ask for their help in accessing correct treatment.

Write to your CCG, why not email your MP and maybe send them this blog? Why not ask your friends and family to do the same?

The BSH have recently bowed under public pressure let’s help Gloucestershire to do the same here, make your voice count!

Don’t let your GP take you down Folly Lane, there is no time for foolishness or delay in treating B12 deficiency, time is of the essence and you deserve every chance possible of repairing your nerves.

Very best wishes

Tracey
www.b12deficiency.info

If you think you might be B12 deficient please click here, and please try not to supplement before testing.

Please add your signature here if you would like to support making B12 OTC in the UK – Please DO NOT pay to sign! Any money given does not go toward the cause you are supporting.

 

Incontinence in women, men & children

One of my symptoms of B12 deficiency was bladder incontinence, I had to keep going to the loo and there was no let up during the small hours either.

Thankfully this was one of my symptoms which corrected within the first weeks of regular B12 injections. Had I not realised I was B12 deficient, I may have believed it was due to my age or my shoe size or my eye colour and perhaps even ‘perfectly normal’. Some of us have difficulty seeking help for incontinence and see it as something to ‘put up with’ rather than something that could and should be treated.

Each time I see TV adverts for companies selling incontinence pads (or those weird ‘pretty??!’ crepe britches) showing young women stating that incontinence is ‘perfectly normal’ I’ll ask the telly, “what if it’s caused by B12 deficiency?”

Apparently 1 in 3 women experience bladder leaks, this is a massive number, some of whom might potentially be in need of B12 but may be unaware of low B12 being a cause.

This report from the BBC shows that the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has issues with these adverts. They criticised TENA for not highlighting to mothers that treatment for the condition is available.

The RCN said: “Incontinence is known to be under reported due to the embarrassment experienced by women living with the condition.

Female incontinence
As you’ll see from the information on the NHS link below, there are a few causes for bladder incontinence related to the pelvic floor muscles, and although they do list ‘neurological conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord such as Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis’  –  just think how helpful it would be if they could alert people by adding B12 deficiency to this list?

  • damage during childbirth – particularly if your baby was born vaginally, rather than by caesarean section
  • increased pressure on your tummy – for example, because you are pregnant or obese
  • damage to the bladder or nearby area during surgery – such as the removal of the womb (hysterectomy), or removal of the prostate gland
  • neurological conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord, such as Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis
  • certain connective tissue disorders such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
  • certain medicines

Male Incontinence
Men also experience incontinence and it’s no surprise that they are even worse than women for talking about it or seeking help. Naturally there are some different causes listed for males (please see below), but would it be on the radar of the GP to test for B12 deficiency even if the subject of incontinence arose at an appointment?

  • chronic cough
  • constipation
  • obesity
  • bladder or urinary tract infections
  • an obstruction in the urinary tract
  • weak pelvic floor or bladder muscles
  • loss of sphincter strength
  • nerve damage
  • enlarged prostate
  • prostate cancer
  • neurological disorders, which can interfere with bladder control signals

Other lifestyle factors that may lead to UI include:

  • smoking
  • drinking
  • not being physically active