When you can’t remember where you live, or who loves you…..

Our poster boy Jasper has been showing the signs of his advancing years.  He was a rescue so we can’t be sure how exactly how old he is, but he’s at least fifteen.

His eyesight and hearing have been deteriorating for a while so we clap to get his attention. People seeing this think we are congratulating him rather that trying to communicate where we are!

A few weeks ago he suddenly stopped being interested in food, he was noticeably confused, he stopped barking, or making any sound at all.

 

dooby-b12-text-version

He has always loved a particular fluffy sheep toy but he no longer recognised this previously constant companion.

He wanted to be outside a lot, but then could not find his way back in, he would stand in one spot under a tree or would stare at the wall vacantly. He failed to recognise us.

His eating habits completely changed and some days he turned his nose up at everything offered. His co-ordination was also affected and at times he struggled to stand up.

He was very distant and for a normally loving and friendly dog this was a real shock.

Three weeks ago our vet came out to assess him and check he was not in any pain and confirmed he was showing signs of senility.

The first thing the did, was give him a B12 injection.  Stating that he could have these when required.

The following two days were much the same as before but on the third day, we were astounded. He wanted to eat, he was happy, he had stopped wanting to be apart from us, he barked and found and chewed on his old friend the sheep!!  He still moves like an elderly dog, he still can’t see or hear too much – but the essence of him is back.

Of course B12 is not the answer to every ill. It is however essential to life and for those who are deficient, whose systems have been starved of it, it can have a miraculously swift effect. This is what B12 does for those of us in need, it gives us our essence back.

Don’t all dementia patients deserve this chance, before it’s too late – just in case?

B12 deficiency is very common in the older population, for many reasons; one being low stomach acid, not helped by the over medication of PPI’s and other acid suppressants.

There is no routine screening of so many at risk patients and too many elderly B12 deficient patients may be missed when there are guidelines for doctors like these below;

Wouldn’t it be lovely if our doctors were not constrained by such ridiculous and out dated instruction?

The name ‘Pernicious anaemia’ confuses doctors – many patients NEVER present with anaemia/macrocytosis – this is very late stage. NICE and BNF Guidelines still categorise B12 deficiency under anaemia and this needs to change.

Thankfully our vet did not have to concern himself with proving Jasper was anaemic, he didn’t have to wait for a B12 serum test, he knew that this kind of presentation in an elderly dog could be down to B12 deficiency and his injection was given without any hesitation. He can also have B12 injections regularly without any quibbling.

If only B12 deficient humans, of any age, could be treated in the same sensible way as this little old fella, the world for them would be so much less confusing.

For those who may be B12 deficient please see this page;  www.b12deficiency.info/what-to-do-next/

If you feel strongly about the restrictions on our B12 treatment please sign and share this petition

www.change.org/p/ian-hudson-please-make-our-life-saving-injectable-vitamin-b12-hydroxocobalamin-available-over-the-counter

If you believe B12 & folate testing should be added to a Full Blood Count please add your name to this petition too.

www.change.org/p/jane-ellison-mp-parliament-uk-add-testing-for-b12-deficiency-to-a-full-blood-count-help-to-stop-permanent-disablement

 

B12deficiency.info 2016 Conference 17th and 18th June – Education for all, B12, methylation and thyroid.

I am delighted to announce our second event and Sally Pacholok will be with us again!

email-banner

The conference will attempt to address the gaps in the diagnosing and understanding of these conditions and the effects on both physical and mental health.

Please note: This is NOT a two day conference, an identical programme will run each day.

Ticket price £62.00
Includes: Presentations, lunch, refreshments, attendance certificate for CPD and free on site parking.


This conference is for all with an interest in the subjects both personally and professionally.

If you are a patient you will learn more about your condition. If you work with people in any field of mental or physical health then this conference will provide high clinical relevance and an attendance certificate for CPD.

It has been arranged by Tracey Witty of www.b12deficiency.info to promote greater awareness and understanding of B12 deficiency, methylation and thyroid disease.

PLEASE NOTE: There is no sponsorship from, nor affiliations to pharmaceutical or vitamin companies at this event (or throughout www.b12deficiency.info).

The speakers are highly knowledgeable, experienced and engaging. They will discuss the multi-systemic and polyglandular nature of the conditions, diagnosis and misdiagnosis.

Q&A time with the speakers is scheduled.

In addition to our speakers we will hear from three patients who will present their own case studies.

Last years attendees said; – Thanks for organising the excellent conference, the speakers were all very engaging and enthusiastic. I don’t think I have ever been at a conference that so many people stayed until the end, especially on a Saturday!

– I am an acupuncturist and during the conference I realised that my training in B12 deficiency was woefully inadequate. Knowing so much more about B12 and methylation has completely changed my practice!

Meet the Speakers

Sally Pacholok RN BSN
Presentation on –
The effect of B12 deficiency on all body systems. Symptoms, causes, those at risk and common misdiagnoses.

Sally was a licensed Advanced Emergency Medical Technician and worked as a paramedic prior to and during nursing school.

In 1985 aged 22, Sally diagnosed herself with vitamin B12 deficiency, after her doctors had failed to identify her condition. Over the past two decades, she has frequently found untreated B12 deficiency in the patients she cares for and has campaigned to raise awareness of this all too common debilitating neurological condition.

During her presentation Sally will be using case studies to show how b12 deficiency affects people of all ages, including babies and children. She will also be reviewing the pathophysiology, signs, symptoms, risk factors, causes, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment.

Sally’s book inspired Emmy winning film producer Elissa Leonard to produce a documentary on misdiagnosed B12 deficiency in 2011 click to watch. Elissa then went on to produce a feature film based on Sally’s life click to watch.

Anne Pemberton
Functional Medicine Practitioner MSc, PGCE (Autism), RGN.
Presentation on –
Genetic Polymorphisms in Chronic fatigue and Autism: Supporting the role of B12 and Folate and their connection to HPU (Kryptopyrroles).
 

Anne spent the first 25 years of her working life as a registered nurse in cardiac intensive care. Her son’s diagnosis of autism and the lack of medical help was the catalyst for Anne’s decision to retrain as a functional medicine practitioner.

Anne is now the Course Director on the MSc in Nutritional Therapy at the Northern College of Acupuncture in York. She also runs a busy international clinic, with special interest in CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) and autism.

Anne uses nutrigenomics data from 23andme.com alongside appropriate functional testing, in order to establish each person’s individual health requirements. She has co-written the first UK based practitioner nutrigenomics course in the UK which is delivered twice yearly in York and London. Anne has also co-authored a book with Dr Damien Downing ‘The vitamin Cure for Digestive Disease’.

Dr. Afshan Ahmad BSc, PhD.
Presentation on –
The effect of thyroid replacement in patients with ‘normal’ thyroid chemistry and clinical signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Development for Vaccine Research Trust, a charity established in 1982 which supports research into why a group of people present with signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism but continue to have blood tests within the reference range. She co-founded Vaccine Research International Plc and helped Dr Gordon Skinner in his thyroid clinic in Birmingham, working closely with him in his dealings with the GMC. In 2000, they published a paper on the effect of thyroid replacement in patients with ‘normal’ thyroid chemistry and clinical signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Afshan qualified with a BSc degree in Immunology and Microbiology from London University in 1983 and joined Dr Gordon Skinner’s vaccine research group at the Medical School, University of Birmingham in 1985, she completed her PhD in Medical Microbiology in 1999.

Dr Joanne Younge
Associate Specialist Old Age Psychiatrist.
Presentation on –
Audit on B12 and folate deficiency in the elderly.

Joanne graduated from Queen’s University, Belfast, in 1996 and is an Associate Specialist Old Age Psychiatrist in an NHS Trust.

Joanne is a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Clinical Lecturer at Queen’s University in Northern Ireland. Her main interest is improving care for patients, either through quality improvement initiatives, using Institute for Healthcare Improvement methodology, or audit.

She co-authored ‘CBT for mild to moderate depression and anxiety’ in 2014 and an audit on improving patient safety, ‘The impact of introducing a Lithium care pathway’, was published as an example of shared learning on the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) website in 2015.

The introduction of an electronic care record, with better access to blood results, and improved insight into the potential impact of deficiencies prompted an audit into B12 and folate deficiency in the elderly patients referred to the local service. She is hopeful that the audit, presented at the conference, will have an impact on improving patient care in the future.

_______________________________________________________

To book your place click here

To read more please visit the conference page.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Tracey

B12 deficiency can strike at any age, it is not confined to women over 60

 

b12-child-port

Signs & symptoms in infants and children
(List supplied by Sally M Pacholok R.N & Dr Jeffrey Stuart co authors of ‘What’s wrong with my child?’

• Developmental delay or regression
• Apathy – Irritability
• Hypotonia (decreased muscle tone)
• Weakness
• Tremor
• Involuntary movements
• Seizures (fits)
• Ataxia (Neurological disorder affecting balance, coordination and speech)
• Anorexia and other eating disorders
• Failure to thrive
• Poor weight gain
• Poor head growth
• Poor socialisation
• Poor motor skills
• Language delay
• Speech problems
• Lower IQ – Mental retardation
• Anaemia
• Macrocytosis (large red blood cells) Note – need not be present!

 

For more information on ‘Red Flags‘ in children please visit

www.b12deficiency.info/children-and-b12/

 

b12-child-land

 

Please see our posters page to share, download and print these posters.

Raising awareness ; http://www.b12deficiency.info/how-you-can-help/

B12 deficiency at the heart of the matter

This little fella spent a long lime in hospital as a child following a diagnosis of Perthes disease (Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease).  Perthes is a childhood hip disorder caused by a disruption of blood flow to the ball of the hip joint.

By the time he was 30 years old he had suffered his first heart attack.

He died aged 37 following his third.

Born 1937 - Died 1973

 Born 1937 – Died 1973

 

Just prior to his first heart attack he experienced intense jaw pain whilst digging the garden and his face drained of colour. In between the 2nd and 3rd attacks he experienced flu-like symptoms but no chest pain and none of the other classic symptoms associated with heart attack. These details were a surprise to me and may be to you too.

This handsome young man was my dad and I inherited many things from him including his hair, a love of woolly jumpers and furniture making skills. (I don’t make a habit of keeping model aeroplanes under my bed though).

Amongst those interesting traits, I also inherited a clotting disorder; Factor V Leiden (FVL) and a myriad of genetic polymorphisms many of which are connected to B12 and folate methylation. (MTHFR, MTRR, MTR,CBS, and BHMT, to name a few).

No one knew why my dad had heart attacks and died so young and it has long remained a mystery, apart from his limp left over from Perthes disease, he appeared to be a fit and healthy young man.

I learned that I had FVL when I was trying to conceive and found that Perthes’ disease also has a connection to FVL. (see refs below).

With the help of genetic testing and the unravelling of my own medical history since being diagnosed as B12 deficient, there are now clear indications of  my dad’s underlying B12 and folate methylation problems.

These coupled with an undiagnosed clotting disorder could have contributed to – or could perhaps be the cause of his death? I wouldn’t mind betting that he had a sky-high homocysteine level but it’s doubtful that testing for this would have been on any radar and even today it’s tricky (if not impossible) to persuade a GP to test.

High homocysteine is known to be strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it is a an amino acid which rises to a toxic level in patients with low, B12, B6 and B9 (folate).  If a high homocysteine level is present and the patient also has FVL then research shows there is an even greater risk of Cardiovascular problems.

I was thankful that the GP I saw upon diagnosis of my B12 deficiency seemed to understand the problems associated with FVL and low B12 and I was reassuringly told -‘We’ll have to look after you’. Sadly this statement was quickly forgotten and the silly games regarding strict rationing of life giving B12 injections began.

I contacted many cardiologists to invite them to the conference we held in May but there was a total lack of interest. They receive millions of pounds in research grants but they don’t appear to want to look at the basics. It is a crying shame they didn’t hear Sally Pacholok and Malcolm Kendrick speak, but when their research money comes from pharmaceutical companies I expect they feel their hands are tied.

On health questionnaires we are often asked if we have a history of certain conditions, it seems that with a shrug of the GP’s shoulders, you must understand that you may succumb to heart attack, Alzheimer’s, or bipolar if they are prevalent conditions in your family (they are in mine). That you just have to take it on the chin and await what comes your way.

Many of us who read and research B12 deficiency, join up the dots early. We know that these conditions and many more can all be related to low B12 and that if we are given vital B12 injections at the frequency we need then we can live healthily and happily. We may also feel that the outcome for many of our loved ones might have been different had the full knowledge of B12 deficiency been available to the clinicians in charge of their care.

We want our doctors to discover and understand this too so we send them journals, advise them to read ‘Could it be B12?’ We lay the facts out in black and white, but we are often ignored, ridiculed and neglected. We understand that this action of trying to educate is irritating to doctors but what else can we do?

We are fighting for our lives whilst we wait for the medical community to catch up.

To see who is at risk of B12 deficiency, please click here http://www.b12deficiency.info/who-is-at-risk/ 

Raising awareness; http://www.b12deficiency.info/how-you-can-help/

Please sign and share this petition, let’s get it over 10,000 signatures; https://www.change.org/p/ian-hudson-please-make-our-life-saving-injectable-vitamin-b12-hydroxocobalamin-available-over-the-counter?

Ann Intern Med. 1997 Nov 15;127(10):895-903.
Factor V Leiden mutation and the risks for thromboembolic disease: a clinical perspective.
Price DT1, Ridker PM.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9382368
J Orthop Res. 2014 Jan;32(1):1-7. doi: 10.1002/jor.22473. Epub 2013 Aug 27.
Meta-analysis of hypercoagulability genetic polymorphisms in Perthes disease.
Woratanarat P1, Thaveeratitharm C, Woratanarat T, Angsanuntsukh C, Attia J, Thakkinstian A.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983171
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2004 Dec;86-A(12):2642-7.
Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and thrombophilia.
Balasa VV1, Gruppo RA, Glueck CJ, Wang P, Roy DR, Wall EJ, Mehlman CT, Crawford AH.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15590848
Acta Orthop Belg. 2007 Oct;73(5):612-7.
Thrombophilia and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: is it a causative factor and does it affect the severity of the disease?
Moens P1, Defoort K, Vancampenhout A, Peerlinck K, Fabry G.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18019917
J Pediatr Orthop. 2007 Oct-Nov;27(7):834-7.
Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, venous and arterial thrombi, and the factor V Leiden mutation in a four-generation kindred.
Glueck CJ1, Tracy T, Wang P.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17878795
Thromb J. 2014 Dec 16;12(1):30. doi: 10.1186/s12959-014-0030-0. eCollection 2014.
Severe hyperhomocysteinemia due to cystathionine β-synthase deficiency, and Factor V Leiden mutation in a patient with recurrent venous thrombosis.
Awan Z1, Aljenedil S2, Rosenblatt DS3, Cusson J4, Gilfix BM2, Genest J5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25516723
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2003 Oct;41(10):1357-62.
The risk of venous thromboembolism associated with the factor V Leiden mutation and low B-vitamin status.
Obeid R1, Hakki T, Jouma M, Herrmann W.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14580166
J Med Assoc Thai. 2000 May;83(5):536-42.
Association between serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, folate and Thai coronary artery disease patients.
Leowattana W1, Mahanonda N, Bhuripunyo K, Pokum S.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10863900
Mini Rev Med Chem. 2012 Sep 1;12(10):997-1006.
Role of polymorphisms in factor V (FV Leiden), prothrombin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) genes as risk factors for thrombophilias.
Miranda-Vilela AL1.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22512572

B12 and Thyroid conference 2015 – an enormous success, incredible feedback and a game changer!

 

I want to say a huge thank you to the fantastic four; Sally Pacholok, Lorraine Cleaver, Umahro Cadogan, and Dr Malcolm Kendrick – who all have more than one thing in common;

A passion for educating and exposing truth, unflappable tenacity and humour!

Sally Pacholok, as we with B12 deficiency know, is an inspiring educator who diagnosed her own condition and is completely dedicated to raising awareness of this condition. The vast amount of information Sally imparts in just 2 hours, is incredible.

Her time in the UK was spent working almost solidly and even during her sparse free time managed to help patients in a profound way. Anyone reading this who would like Sally to speak at an event then please get in touch, you won’t look back!

Lorraine Cleaver told us of her shocking experience of thyroid disease, her planned suicide and her road back to health after appalling treatment due to ignorance. She also recounted Jill’s story, which echoed her own experience as Jill remained undiagnosed with B12 deficiency and Graves disease for years. Jill was subjected to ECT (Electroconvulsive therapy) in place of what her body required. This presentation was profoundly moving.

Umahro Cadogan became so ill in his teens that he too had to become his own doctor. He has made it his life’s work to educate himself and others on nutrition and nutrigenomics. His presentation on methylation, a hugely complex subject, was expertly delivered making it accessible to all.

Dr Malcolm Kendrick talked about the shocking state of accepted medical data. He is the kind of GP we all want, sensible, caring, humorous. He sorts the wheat from the chaff and is determined to shine the light on the dark corners of medicine. I have followed his blog for years and if you don’t already, then sign up!

IMG_9888

Pic. Dr Jeffrey Stuart, Sally Pacholok, Umahro Cadogan and me.

Just a couple of hours after the conference emails started to arrive from delegates and I was stunned and delighted, here is the first;

“ Thanks for organising the excellent conference today. I was delighted to attend and learnt a lot and met some lovely people. The speakers were all very engaging and enthusiastic.

I don’t think I have ever been at a conference that so many people stayed until the end, especially on a Saturday! That is testament to the line-up you organised. Well done. I hope it makes a difference.“

 Dr J Younge –

Well, judging by my inbox there has already been a huge shift – the day really can be labelled ‘A Game Changer’!

Dr J Younge sums it up perfectly, the delegates were completely engaged right up until the end.

For those of you who attended you will know that there was an impressive (and surprising) number of health professionals across all disciplines who attended and who thankfully took the time to write;

“Congratulations on organising a really interesting day.

The speakers were excellent and inspiring and gave us plenty to think about!”

Dr S Williams

For those of you who couldn’t attend – I promise there will be more events in the future. (I have never done this before, but I really enjoyed it!)

It worked because of the quality and mix of the speakers, and because of the connection between all of the subjects. Those who came are now determined to make a change.

It was a fantastic day and I have learnt a lot about how to make it even better next time.

Heartfelt thanks to Dr Jeffrey Stuart and of course to Damian Witty.

Thanks to all who supported me in organising this event – you are priceless!

Tracey x

www.b12deficiency.info is my passion, highlighting mental health, fertility, pregnancy and children is a must.

 

For more information on the speakers please visit – http://www.b12deficiency.info/conference/

If you want to help us to access Hydroxobalamin OTC please sign and share this petition.

If you want to make the education of nutritional deficiencies for doctors compulsory and comprehensive please sign and share this petition too.

Lets continue to work together, we will make a difference.

http://www.b12deficiency.info/how-you-can-help/

B12 & Thyroid Conference – Wilful blindness, apathy or a case of short arms, deep pockets?

I am sorry I haven’t been here for a while, I have been arranging a conference on B12 deficiency, thyroid disease, genetics and data. (www.b12deficiency.info/conference)

Anyone who reads this blog knows how difficult it can be to access correct treatment and understanding of their condition.

I hoped (and still hope) that the 16th of May would go a little way towards helping to change this, however it seems I may be wrong!

The fact is, I have hand delivered personal invitations to nearly 200 GP’s local to the area. Others have emailed invitations, asked their own GP’s to attend and tweeted the event too, thank you all. I have sent hundreds of invitations via email to NHS organisations, health educators and healthcare professionals and the response has been DISMAL.

Amongst those who have booked are psychiatrists, pharmacists, acupuncturists and nurses, so all is not lost and there is still time for those who have been invited to stump up and turn up to what promises to be an excellent day. (I still have faith!)

I was warned that GP’s wouldn’t attend – that they are just not interested, that they only go to free events, usually free thanks to pharmaceutical sponsorship.  Who knows the real reason, perhaps they are all at weddings?

I do know there are some GP’s who are up to speed on both these conditions, however the vast majority are not. These petitions are testament to this fact –

Lorraine Cleaver – Effective thyroid and adrenal testing, diagnosis and treatment.
www.scottish.parliament.uk/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01463

Andrea MacArthur – Updating of Pernicious Anaemia-VitaminB12 Deficiency understanding & treatment.
www.scottish.parliament.uk/GettingInvolved/Petitions/petitionPDF/PE01408.pdf

Tracey Witty
www.change.org/p/ian-hudson-please-make-our-life-saving-injectable-vitamin-b12-hydroxocobalamin-available-over-the-counter?

Here’s what GP Margaret McCartney has to say on this subject –

Margaret McCartney: Forever indebted to pharma—doctors must take control of our own education

http://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h1965 

“A colleague told me that attendance plummeted when she decided to end the pharma sponsorship of an annual educational event and to charge doctors £40 each instead. Are we so culturally attached to free education that we don’t care about the price? A £40 fee is hardly robbery, and free education is not worth the unwritten debt to sponsors.

At these events it’s also often unclear what vested interests speakers have until they flash a slide at the start of their talks. We should insist on seeing a full declaration of potential conflicts and sponsors before we sign up.

By deciding what we need and what we would like to learn, we can set our own agenda rather than be the recipients of someone else’s…..”

I wish I could shoulder the cost of this event and offer it for free but I can’t, however there are NO SPONSORS and NO AFFILIATION with anyone selling a drug or a supplement, it is not for profit.

Everything I do to raise awareness of B12 deficiency is personally funded by me and my husband Damian, because this condition has affected us so profoundly and because we care about those in the same boat (and indeed in the ‘connected boat’ of thyroid disease). There are many of us spending countless hours voluntarily, working to raise awareness and support sufferers of both conditions.

The £62 ticket price covers the cost of the event; food, refreshments, technical staff, technical equipment, building hire, printing, promoting, and the minimal expenses of four excellent speakers on interesting and vitally important topics.

  • Sally Pacholok RN BSN – The effect of B12 deficiency on all body systems. Symptoms, causes, those at risk and common misdiagnoses.
  • Lorraine Cleaver Expert Patient – Diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease from a patient’s perspective.
  • Umahro Cadogan Adjunct Professor of Nutrition – Genetic polymorphisms and the role of B12 and folate in methylation.
  • Dr. Malcolm Kendrick MbChB, MRCGP GP – Doctoring data – how data are manipulated to present information in wildly inaccurate ways.

People who have an interest in the subjects, who are not health care professionals, do want to come and were previously excluded – I’m sorry this was a BIG MISTAKE.

Those of us with these conditions may be aware of the effects they have on mental health, fertility, children, cardiovascular health (etc,etc) but it seems that the vast majority of our GP’s and medical educators prefer to stay in the dark.

The aim was obviously to educate the people who in turn can help us. The polypharmacy we are subjected to thanks to this knowledge gap, is out of control. Patients are taking more and more drugs to modify symptoms while the root cause is ignored.

It is very clear that we, the patient, have to continue to learn as much as we can about our conditions in order that we can then try to teach those who ‘care’ for us.

I am saddened that this is the way it has to be and that even though we didn’t choose medicine as a career, we continue to be forced to study it.

Lest make this event a catalyst for change. If you can come we’d love to see you there.

Where: Loughborough University
When: Saturday May 16th (9am – 6pm)
Cost: £62
Inc: Lunch, free on-site parking, post conference webinar and attendance certificate (upon request)

For further information and booking please visit www.b12deficiency.info/conference

B12 Awareness in 2015

The past twelve months have been filled with a schedule of hard work for Sally Pacholok.

The long awaited film based on Sally’s life by Elissa Leonard and a new book of childhood B12 deficiency,  add up to a momentous year.

The world premiere of the film will be held at the US Naval Heritage Center, Washington on the 28th of February. Sally is played by actress Annet Mahendru. http://dciff-indie.org/sally-pacholok/

You can have a sneak preview here!  http://vimeo.com/user8814977/review/118546403/ec3a094649

‘What is wrong with my Child? – From Neurological and Developmental Disabilities to Autism…….How to protect your child from B12 Deficiency’, will be released on the 15th of March and can be pre ordered from Amazon now;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Whats-Wrong-Child-Consequences-Deficiency/dp/1610352440/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1422638835&sr=1-3&keywords=what%27s+wrong+with+my+child

What's-Wrong-with-My-Child-Title-Information

All this news brings anyone with B12 deficiency a sense of great hope for increased awareness of this condition in 2015.

Sally Pacholok is dedicated to the job she loves, she works as an ER nurse and remains on the frontline of identifying patients with this condition on a regular basis.

There are many of us who are alive and well now because we armed ourselves with information from ‘Could it be B12?’ The life saving manual written by Sally and her husband Dr. Jeffrey Stuart.

Research from this book was used to create the ‘Are you at Risk?’ B12 deficiency smart phone app which can be downloaded for Free here;

http://www.b12deficiency.info/about-the-b12-apps/

Raising awareness; http://www.b12deficiency.info/how-you-can-help/

‘Sally Pacholok’ – A film based on the true story of an ER nurse who takes on the medical establishment when she uncovers an epidemic of misdiagnosis.

It is with great pleasure that I post this Press release below for the film ‘Sally Pacholok’. The feature film, based on Sally’s life, has been entered to the Sundance Film Festival and will make its UK premiere in cinema’s next year.

Thanks to the drive and foresight of Director and Producer Elissa Leonard, ‘Sally Pacholok’ is set to to shine a bright light on B12 deficiency and change the current, limited understanding of the devastating effects of this condition.

Sally’s name will be firmly cemented into the minds of the public and healthcare professionals alike, and will be made synonymous with vitamin B12 deficiency. The impact of this film will play an important role in helping to save even more lives.

Elissa’s earlier documentary, ‘Diagnosing and treating B12 deficiency’, demonstrates exactly how dire the situation can be for B12 deficient patients. The hard hitting image of a paediatrician who is near death, clad only in a nappy, is one which stays with the viewer for a very long time. He was seriously B12 deficient but was misdiagnosed with a rare neurological disease.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvEizypoyO0

Thank goodness Sally Pacholok has the passion and generosity required to work tirelessly to educate both health professionals and the public about this life threatening neurological condition.  Her ability to impart clear concise information both in person, and in the written word, (Could it Be B12? An Epidemic of Misdiagnosis – co authored with her husband Dr Jeffrey Stuart), has already saved many lives around the world. Could It Be B12? has been translated into Dutch and Slovenian, and has recently been published in India.

If you think you may be B12 deficient please visit: http://www.b12deficiency.info/what-to-do-next/

Raising awareness; http://www.b12deficiency.info/how-you-can-help/

Please also consider joining Pat Kornic’s life saving support group

Press release below;

Leonard Spends Summer Making Dramatic Feature

Elissa Leonard produced and directed a dramatic feature film in May and spent the summer in post production.  The film is a 90-minute whistle-blower/romance written by Elissa Leonard and Patrick Prentice.  Sally Pacholok is based on the true story of an ER nurse who takes on the medical establishment when she uncovers an epidemic of misdiagnosis.  (Think Erin Brockovitch about healthcare.)  Elissa bought the life story rights to Sally Pacholok in 2012.

Annet Mahendru and Elissa Leonard

Annet Mahendru plays the title role of nurse Sally Pacholok.  Ms. Mahendru is a break out star on The Americans on FX, where she plays sultry Soviet spy Nina Sergeevna.    Andrew Ballard plays Dr. Jeff Stuart, the real life husband of Sally Pacholok.

With the exception of Annet Mahendru, cast and crew were from the Baltimore and DC areas.  The local SAG casting was done by Pat Moran and Associates.  Jeremy Morrison was the line producer and editor.  Nick Gardner was the director of photography, Dave Cross was the AD, Alex Jennings was the location sound mixer,  Angela Ratliff was the production designer, Julie Bent was the costume designer, and Pickles Kinion was lead hair and makeup.  Paige Gold was the production’s lawyer and Judy Walder the accountant.  Charlie Barnett wrote the film score and Studio Unknown did the sound design.

The film was shot in 19 days in the MD/DC area and you can see more of it here.  Expect to see a Power of the Purse announcement soon!

B12 ignorance Australia….

This Australian doctor took the precaution of getting the patient to sign a waiver before he would administer B12 injections. He also makes some interesting/ridiculous notes in the patients records.

The GP sees that the patient benefits greatly from the B12 injections and records that the effect ‘lasts a few days and then wears off’.  In trying to educate the GP, the patient has given a copy of the excellent book ‘Could it be B12?’ as a reference.  Despite his own gross ignorance of B12 deficiency the GP disparagingly states that the author is ‘not qualified’, and also ‘written by a nurse’, ‘anecdotal stories’ ‘unsubstantiated claims’.

It seems this GP needs to brush up on his reading skills, he does not understand the importance of this exceptional, definitive, life saving book which is not only co authored by a highly qualified and experienced nurse – Sally Pacholok R.N – and her husband Dr Jeffrey Stuart. Sally is also B12 deficient.

This book is brimming with facts, advice, journals and case studies. This GP sadly missed an opportunity to update his appalling lack of knowledge.

You’ll note that he also rolls out the same old lines regarding  ‘treating possible underlying depressive illness’ and ‘placebo’. Predictably he is also concerned about ‘frequent injections despite high serum levels’.

I wonder if the following statement has ever appeared in any of his other patient’s notes –

‘I advised patient of my concerns of prescribing the following cocktail and I got them to sign a waiver  ’ Olanzapine, Lithium, Lisinopril, Simvastatin, Sodium Valporate, Bendroflumethiazide’ . . . . .  I seriously doubt it!

It seems many GP’s are totally unconcerned when they give out such a mix of chemicals, and it’s perplexing that so many get so jittery when prescribing an essential, inexpensive vitamin of which there is no known toxicity.

 

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To see more letters please visit http://www.b12deficiency.info/letters

Please consider signing and sharing our petition – you will be helping to save lives
http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/ian-hudson-please-make-our-life-saving-injectable-vitamin-b12-hydroxocobalamin-available-over-the-counter

Raising awareness;  You can help!