Dying to breathe

Three weeks ago I thought I might be taking my last breath. I had a virus which coupled with whooping cough (that I caught back in April), meant that each breath I took felt like trying to push a train uphill, through a very, very tight tunnel.

Thankfully, excellent care from first responders Gina and Bob and paramedics Rachel and Dan saved me from hospital. I am now fully on the road to recovery.

This terrifying experience was relatively short lived but I know that for some with B12 deficiency the inability to breathe without real effort is part of everyday life. Those who are desperately under treated or are currently undiagnosed may struggle with these symptoms everyday.

The problem for many with presenting symptoms of B12 deficiency which include depression and anxiety may result in them being given a mental health diagnosis whilst their physical symptoms are disregarded.

B12, iron and magnesium deficiency can cause breathing problems but how often are these causes fully explored?

Mental Health diagnoses often equal invisibility for patients and a separation from other physical health disciplines, but the link between poor mental health and B12 deficiency was made over 100 years ago.

Unfortunately patients with poor mental health with undiagnosed B12 deficiency are often given higher and higher doses of antipsychotics and antidepressants but experience a lack of response and continued  deterioration.

Please see;
Does B12 Deficiency Lead to Lack of Treatment Response to Conventional Antidepressants?
Subjects with depression who do not respond to conventional antidepressants should be evaluated for nutritional factors.
At times, medical disorders may be mistaken for a primary psychiatric disturbance because of prominent and commonly associated psychiatric or behavioral manifestations. The lack of recognition of the underlying medical condition precludes optimal treatment even though the psychiatric treatment might be appropriate for the symptoms, often manifesting as inadequate response or psychotropic treatment resistance.1 Increasing severity of the underlying medical illness can also increase the risk of relapse in psychiatric disorders despite adequate psychotropic medication.2
Desperate Mental Health Patient
I became aware of this patient after seeing her post on social media.
She is currently being held under section 3 of the Mental Health Act. She has been in hospital since midsummer of this year. She has had an unsuccessful tribunal.
Her diagnoses include:
Depression
Anxiety
Depression with psychotic features
Schizoaffective disorder
Somatic symptom disorder
(Obviously there are a great many causes for poor mental health which include: B12, folate, and magnesium deficiency and thyroid problems.)
Drugs administered
Aripiprazole
Venlafaxine
Risperidone
Escitolpram
For the past three years this patient has experienced:
High blood pressure – (magnesium deficiency and hyperthyroidism?)
An inability to breathe without effort – (iron, magnesium and B12 deficiency?)
Tightening and choking around the throat – (an inability to swallow can also be caused by iron deficiency, magnesium deficiency and hyperthyroidism).
Can you imagine being sectioned, struggling for breath and struggling to swallow, but all those in charge of your care ignore requests for further investigation for the cause of your symptoms?
Not being heard, or ‘seen’ properly is shattering to anyone in hospital but if you are held under section 3 of the Mental Health Act you are literally at the mercy of somebody else. You cannot refuse treatment under this section.
This patient can’t call paramedics, can’t make herself properly heard and has been told that her physical symptoms are in her mind. But what if she has never been screened for nutritional deficiencies or hyperthyroidism despite presenting with symptoms?
What if she has been screened but the test results have not been fully understood due to the limitations of B12 and thyroid testing? Strict reliance on ‘normal’ lab reference ranges means so many people deteriorate without any treatment for the root cause of their symptoms.
Whilst psychosomatic symptoms (physical illness or other condition caused or aggravated by a mental factor such as internal conflict or stress) are a very real thing, physical causes for poor mental health should always be ruled out. If doctors haven’t received any training in the fundamentals of nutrition, then they aren’t exploring this as a cause. This situation needs to be rectified.
Have you been told your symptoms are psychosomatic?
Have you been injected with antipsychotics against your will?

Are you terrified that each breath you take might be your last?

This is what this patient is living through now.
We need those who are in charge of her care to take a serious look at information surrounding vitamin B12 and other nutrient deficiencies for her and others with mental health problems.
For those who follow my blog you may be aware that  in September Dr Marjorie Ghisoni facilitated my lecture on B12 deficiency for RCN members in North wales and for Mental Health Nursing students at Bangor University. What we need are more open minded clinicians like Marjorie who will make an enormous difference to their patients once armed with fundamental information which is currently missing from their training.
Please share this blog, you could make a difference to someones life.
Best wishes Tracey
If you are a health professional requiring training on B12 deficiency please contact me at tracey@b12deficiency.info for more information.
Are you aware that exposure to toxins such as carbon monoxide can cause B12 deficiency?
If you think you may be B12 deficient then please visit this page:
Please don’t supplement with oral B12 before testing, this could skew your results. 
If this blog post and my website has helped you please visit;

 

The North Wales Branch of The Royal College of Nursing leads the way!

On October the 2nd 2017 the first North Wales RCN CPD Conference, included B12 deficiency thanks to
Dr Marjorie Ghisoni.

This fantastic CPD Conference offered a range of inspiring talks for the nurses in attendance.

I was honoured to be speaking on a subject I’m so passionate about and just a stones throw from my first school.


Dr Marjorie Ghisoni, Kate Parry, Tracey Witty, Susie Griffiths.

During my presentation – ‘How often is B12 deficiency missed?‘ I used case studies and documents which detailed the many issues B12 deficient patients face, including the limitations and low reference ranges of the serum B12 test and the harmful, restricted UK treatment regime. Explaining that severe neurological and psychiatric symptoms of B12 deficiency very often precede anaemia and the misconception that only patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pernicious anaemia need B12 injections.

It was important to make the point that all cases of B12 deficiency, whatever the cause, are serious and require correct treatment. Unfortunately letters like the one above are regularly sent out to patients to stop vital treatment with a lack of knowledge of the harm they will cause to the recipient.

It was crucial to me that delegates were given tools to help identify B12 deficiency in their patients. The presentation helped to give the nurses an understanding of how to advocate for their patients who were diagnosed but under treated and for screening for those they think may be at risk of B12 deficiency.

To finish off the morning, Susie Griffiths then spoke about her personal experience of B12 deficiency and it’s effect on her family.

If you’d like more information on the education of B12 deficiency, please email me tracey@b12deficiency.info

Afternoon Workshop

Most of the discussion in the afternoon workshop was centred around the shock these nurses felt that this vital information was missed from their training and that of most clinicians.

What they learned meant that there was a realisation that so many of the patients they work with are at huge risk of B12 deficiency, due not only to their poor mental health, but also due to the wide use of metformin in this group of patients.

It was a surprise to many that the reference range in North wales is amongst the lowest at 150 ng/L and that ranges all over the UK differ. They left knowing that this complex condition is simple and easy to treat and could clearly see why lack of education and current practice leads to common misdiagnoses.

These nurses, who are passionate about their patients well being, will take this newly acquired information into practice and the patients under their care will directly benefit. The RCN North Wales Branch is proud to be leading the way!

A few evaluations from the day;

Must learn more about this subject. Extremely interesting, very knowledgeable speaker who is obviously passionate about raising awareness of B12 deficiency. I had a lack of knowledge before this session, it has encouraged me to research this topic.

Would be good to present to a multidisciplinary forum including GPs and junior doctors.

I found your session absolutely fascinating and I will visit the website to further my understanding. I had no idea how serious B12 deficiency was, so much of what you explained/shared resonated with me.  Thank you for sharing your experience with us all.

So informative, I will be discussing this at our team meeting including our consultants – looking forward to looking at the website.

Inspirational and thought provoking and will consider in my work.

 

Another opportunity to raise awareness

In the evening the film ‘Sally Pacholok’ was screened for the villagers of Rhosneigr, Anglesey. If you haven’t seen this film yet it offers a great opportunity to be educated. Please follow use this link to watch.

Bangor University.

The following day Dr Marjorie Ghisoni had arranged for the second and third year Mental Health Nursing Students at Bangor University to be educated about B12 deficiency.  These students will now be able to apply this knowledge to their clinical practice.

From the questions taken afterwards, it was clear just how many of their lives were already effected by ignorance of the condition and the resulting under treatment of B12 deficiency. For so many, the new information provided a huge missing part of a jigsaw. It was heartening to hear that so many planned to further study B12 deficiency in their research projects.

The emails I received within hours of the talks are testament to the fact that if you give people the right information and tools they need, they can achieve a diagnosis and correct treatment. There’s now a whole new band of people badgering their colleagues, friends and family about B12 deficiency and this really is something to celebrate!

The hits on the website and the signatures on the OTC petition show just how inspired they were to make a difference.

It was an honour to be part of helping RCN Members in North Wales Nurses and our future Mental Health Nurses to take the lead in education of B12 deficiency.

Heartfelt thanks to Dr Marjorie Ghisoni for recognising the great need for this training and for making this happen!

Perhaps you need comprehensive training on B12 Deficiency and how if affects patients, or are looking for speakers at your event? If so please get in touch via; tracey@b12deficiency.info

Best wishes

Tracey
www.B12deficiency.info

Refs;

2015 Vitamin B12 Deficiency: An Important Reversible Co-Morbidity in Neuropsychiatric Manifestations
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4341306/

2015 Vitamin B12 deficiency: an important reversible co-morbidity in neuropsychiatric manifestations.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25722508

2009. Malignant catatonia in a patient with bipolar disorder, B12 deficiency, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: one cause or three?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/19820558/?i=1&from=b12%20AND%20catatonia

2009 Psychotic disorder and extrapyramidal symptoms associated with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency.(B12 deficiency-psychotic disorder, extrapyramidal symptoms in a 12-year-old boy)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/19095695/?i=2&from=b12%20AND%20catatonia

2012. Psychotic disorder, hypertension and seizures associated with vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.(“…..vitamin B(12) level should be checked in patients who do not have an obvious cause for psychosis, seizures or hypertension.”)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22027500/?i=2&from=B12%20psychosis%20AND%20%22blood%20was%20normal%22

2013. Association between vitamin b12 levels and melancholic depressive symptoms: a Finnish population-based study.(“The vitamin B12 level was associated with melancholic DS but not with non-melancholic DS.)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23705786

2013 Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as an acute confusional state: a case report and review of literature. (With anaemia)(“Total resolution of the psychiatric symptoms occurred following parenteral vitamin B12 replacement therapy.”)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/24250331/?i=1&from=b12%20and%20delirium

2013 Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome disguised as mental illness.(“The diagnosis of her endocrinopathies were likely delayed for many years due to the psychiatric disorder….”)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23632176

2013 Delirium as a result of vitamin B12 deficiency in a vegetarian female patient. (“The neuropsychiatric symptoms may be concurrent or precede the other symptoms.”)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23859997

2013 Cobalamin deficiency: clinical picture and radiological findings. (“Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs”)http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24248213

2013 Decreased whole-blood global DNA methylation is related to serum hormones in anorexia nervosa adolescents.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286295

2013 Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24339839

2013 Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as an acute confusional state: a case report and review of literature.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24250331

2014 The neurology of folic acid deficiency.

(“In both deficiency states [b12/folate] there is often dissociation between the neuropsychiatric and the hematologic complications.”)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24365361

2016 Long-term Metformin Use and Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880159/

2012 Metformin associated B12 deficiency.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22799121

2014 Vitamin B12 status in metformin treated patients: systematic review.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24959880

2016 Association between metformin and vitamin B12 deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27130885

2016 Study of Vitamin B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy in metformin-treated early Type 2 diabetes mellitus.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27730072

2017 Developing a metformin prescribing tool for use in adults with mental illness to reduce medication-related weight gain and cardiovascular risk.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28747113